Category Archives: Quackenbush Airguns

Born Wild Shooting Chair

The Born Wild Shooting Chair is designed for precision and comfortable hunting and target shooting. The Born Wild Shooting Chair is made in Northern California one at a time by talented craftsmen. It was designed for folks who shoot and hunt with rifles, both airgun, center fire, rim fire and even shotguns. It works well for the range, or out in the field. It will make any shooter improve on accuracy and comfort.

Personally, I use the Born Wild Shooting Chair for varmint and pest hunting in my backyard at night with my .25 caliber air rifles. I also use the Born Wild Shooting Chair for banging steel gongs at a farm at 50, 100, and 200 yards away with my .458 and .58 Quackenbush Big Bore Air Rifles. Those things kick like a center fire powder burner, and I have developed a serious flinch. Using the shooting chair helps remove my flinch and I can sit comfortably, line up my shots and squeeze. Because the shooting chair swivels 360 degrees around, and up and down, it’s easy for me to target a gong to my right and quickly shift way to my left and at a farther distance.

Turkey Hunting Chair

While I haven’t used it for serious hunting yet, it is on my bucket list to take it Turkey hunting this fall with the intention of taking head shots only. I think that the shooting chair or perhaps turkey hunting chair will steady my shots, and allow me smaller targets at greater distances. The tan color of the chair helps it blend in to the background. Turkeys have excellent eyesight, and so I will end up setting up a camouflaged blind, set up the hunting chair, and wait for the Turkey’s to come on by.

Born Wild Shooting Chair
Born Wild Shooting Chair

Ground Squirrel Hunting Chair

Next on my list is ground squirrel hunting at a beef cow farm in the valley. The California ground squirrel is a serious pest for farmers, whether it be hay, vegetable crops, dairy, meat cow, horses etc. They dig deep burrows that will break a critter’s leg, and break equipment come harvest and plowing time. They can decimate a nut crop, or just bring disease onto a farm. The nasty ground squirrel carries fleas, and diseases such as bubonic plague. Farmers hate them. So I’ll drive to a farm I know of and set up my squirrel chair and blast squirrels all day. Can’t think of a better use for a Born Wild Ground Squirrel Hunting Chair.

Range Shooting Chair

When I head to the range it’s to sight in my rifles, to blow off some steam and just have fun. I do hate the typical concrete benches and steel stools. My fanny ends up aching, and my neck gets out of whack since I can’t quite move things around to my liking. I often carry my Lead Sled to the range, weight it with 25lbs of steel, and strap my flinch inducing DAQ .58 Short Rifle or the DAQ .458 LA Outlaw. It is so uncomfortable to shoot though. It’s just one of the things I love about the Born Wild Shooting Chair. Plop your rifle in, strap it in or not, sit down, and adjust height, or angle to make yourself comfortable, and shoot away. It really is like night an day in terms of comfort. Plus, I shoot much better since I’m comfortable, I am stable, the rifle is stable, and fatigue sets in much, much later.

Portable Shooting Chair

A shooting chair ain’t worth a squat if you can’t get it to where you want to do your shooting or hunting. The Born Wild Portable Shooting Chair shines in this feature. It is reasonably light, and you can pack it in your backpack, or in a duffle that Born Wild will be offering. It takes just a minute to assemble and disassemble, so you have more time to shoot. Make a shooting chair a portable shooting chair, and hunters and shooters will fall in love with it, and treat it as indispensable as any other hunting and shooting gear.

Prairie Dog Shooting Chair

Out on the rolling plains you’ll find massive numbers of Prairie Dogs, and a gaggle of Prairie Dog hunters, all taking a different approach to setting up and shooting these pests. Some folks use a shooting bench, others lay on the ground with the bugs and deal with itching. Others use fabricated hunting chairs. I think the Born Wild Shooting Chair is perhaps a perfect solution. It swivels up and down and side to side, and allows you to quickly target prairie dogs on a wide field.

Best Shooting Chair

What features make the Born Wild Shooting Chair the best shooting chair for hunting, plinking, and target shooting?

Born Wild Shooting Chair Features

  • Light Weight
  • Portable
  • Ambidextrous
  • Powder Coated
  • Leather Forearm and Rear Arm
  • Comfortable
  • Adjustable Height
  • Ammo Tray
  • Adjustable Padded Seat
  • Secure Rifle Strap
  • Rotates 360 degrees
  • Tilts Up and Down
  • Comfortable Arm Rests Left and Right

Quackenbush .58 Outlaw Pistol

Dennis Quackenbush has been making extremely desirable big bore airguns for many years. Old world craftsmanship with modern know how and machinery, and a classic aesthetic as well as massive power are some of the admirable and desirable attributes of Quackenbush Airguns.

Quackenbush airguns are in such demand that he only sells Outlaw air rifles after he opens up a list that is really a raffle that people are randomly chosen from. Once on the list it may take a year or more to actually get the Airgun you ordered.

I have been trying for three years now to get on that list, but I’ve yet to get lucky. Well, unlucky until a few weeks ago. I regularly go by the Quackenbush (D.A.Q.) website to check on that list and see if it is open or there has been some other status change. On this particular day there was no change in the list, rather there was a status change in that Dennis had some DAQ Outlaw Pistols available for purchase and there was no list involved! Hoozah!

I will admit that as I slept on this knowledge that I could soon be an owner of a Genuine Quackenbush I also was worried that the .58 caliber ammo was going to be hard to find and be so huge as to have a air powered slingshot as opposed to a pistol or a carbine. A 58 cal lead ball is pretty heavy at 279 grains and I thought that I might be biting off more than I can chew. I also admit to myself and anyone listening that I do love big explosions and horsepower like my 12 valve Cummins surrounded by a Dodge. I threw caution to the wind and called Dennis and agreed to send him a bunch of money and in return he’d send me a 58 Caliber Dennis Quackenbush Outlaw Pistol mechanism minus the Crosman 1377/1322 trigger frame assembly he recommends as a suitable trigger.

I just posted the following to the AirgunGuild:

Quackenbush .58 Outlaw Pistol First Thoughts.

When I unwrapped the package containing one Quackenbush (D.A.Q.) .58 caliber Outlaw Pistol minus trigger assembly I thought to myself that this is some serious business. Beautifully blued barrel, air tube, and breech and some mighty large chunks of metal for the bolt and cocking handle, hammer, etc. To tell you the truth I was suddenly a bit nervous holding this thing in my hands. It looked and felt huge for a pistol.

Got down to business and installed the new Crosman 1377/1322/2040 etc trigger frame and pieces and parts. Then realized I’d neglected to install the spring and ball bearing for the safety. Took it apart and installed the safety bits, but before reinstalling squashed the trigger spring a little since trigger feel has so stiff. Put back together and left in in gun cabinet for a few days.

Got home from Jujutsu and made a Beeline to the shop. Took the DAQ out and decided to see how it felt with a Crosman plastic stock on it. Not bad, but I really think the DAQ needs a chunk of walnut caressing all that blued steel. Stock needs to be maybe an inch longer for me.

I think I have a large enough chunk of walnut somewhere. I think being the keyword.

Started to put on a Bugbuster scope, but alas won’t fit. The mounts are too close together. Going to have to figure something out. Decided to order a red dot… Will see how that works out.

I worked the bolt and cocking knob for a while being that everything is tight. Greased up the metal to metal contacts to avoid galling.

Finally decided it was time to fill the beast up. Took it slowly up to 3k which may actually be 2800k since this gauge is a bit questionable. Shot it with no bullet and as it went off in my closed up shop, I jumped. Holy $&@;! That surely woke the dead. Refilled to 3k and stuck in a 58 cal store bought round ball. Stacked up two layers of 2x fir in front of my pellet trap, and a 2×12 behind the trap and one additional layer of 3/4 plywood. Turned on Chrony, held my breath and pulled the trigger.

Holy mother of God, the sound was even louder, and I jumped as most of the wood in front and behind the pellet trap went flying every which way. First 2×4 split in two and dented 2×6 behind it. I swear the pellet trap which weighs about 35lbs got moved a few inches. Chrony said 446.3 fps.

Put all the wood back together and clamped the mess together. Loaded up the Outlaw again, cocked and held my breath and let loose the hand cannon. KAPOW! Stuff fell off the shelves and knocked the wood apart as the clamps gave in. Chrony said 538.3 fps.

I stopped. Was fearful I was going to break something.

I am still giggling at the absolute raw power of this Quackenbush Beast of an AirGun!

More to come!

Quackenbush .58 cal Outlaw Pistol Specifications:

Length: 20″
Height: 6 1/8″
With Crosman 1377/1322/2040 grip

Barrel diameter: .75″
Bore: .575″
AirTube diameter: 1.3″
Weight with Crosman stock: 5 lbs 7 3/8oz
Weight with Grip: 4 lbs 11 3/4 oz

.58 Hornady Lead Ball 279gn

1. 446.3 fps – 123.43 fpe
2. 538.3 fps – 179.56 fpe